Slide 1 : Comparison of finger millet panicles grown with SFMI (SRI) methods on left and conventional methods on right Slide 2 :System of Finger Millet Intensification on left; regular management of improved variety and of traditional variety on right, picture courtesy of PRADAN, Orissa
Comparison of finger millet panicles grown with SFMI (SRI) methods on left and conventional methods on right (Powerpoint Presentation)
by Norman Uphoff, Pardan, 31 March, 2007
Paddy Cultivation Through Conventional and SRI Method - Comparative Results from Himachal Pradesh and Uttarakhand
Paddy Cultivation Through Conventional and SRI Method - Comparative Results from Himachal Pradesh and Uttarakhand
by , SRI, 01 January, 2006
A one day dialogue workshop on the System of Rice Intensification (SRI) in Orissa was organised by the Centre for World Solidarity (CWS), Orissa Resource Centre, Bhubaneswar with the support of the Xavier Institute of Management, Bhubaneswar (XIMB), the Department of Agriculture, Orissa, Oxfam India Eastern Region and the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF), Hyderabad. The workshop was held at IMAGE auditorium, Bhubaneswar on the 23rd June and was attended by 80 participants. Participants in the workshop included representatives from the State Agricultural Department and other Government agencies, Research Organisations like Central Rice Research Institute (CRRI), Orissa University for Agricultural Technology (OUAT), SRI practitioners from around ten districts including civil society groups such as Sambhav and PRADAN. Important dignitaries who contributed significantly for the success of this workshop include Dr. Arvind Padhee, Director - Orissa State Agricultural Department, Prof. Radha Mohan – Orissa State Information Commissioner,
Orissa State Dialogue On System of Rice Intensification (SRI)
by , WWF, 23 June, 2007
Rice is the most important food crop in Orissa grown throughout the state covering over 64 % of the net sown area, often as a single crop though with tremendous diversity of rice varieties. The cropping intensity is also quite low with over 75% of the net sown area not having a second crop. The climatic conditions and landholding pattern (predominantly small holder) has meant farmers opting for predominantly subsistence and rainfed agriculture with low use of inputs. Despite several interventions there seems to be a mismatch between technological efforts and farmers practices resulting in large yield gaps and stagnant agricultural productivity. In such a context practices that rely on low inputs and yet provide increased productivity have immense potential in the state with enormous implications for food security where close to half the population is below the poverty line.
State level workshop on System of Rice Intensification in Orissa
by , WWF, 23 June, 2007
Posters were submitted, 61 in all, from all over India, ranging from Jammu in the north to theAndaman Islands in the Indian Ocean, reporting scientific research findings and results fromfield operations. Presentations on the introduction of SRI and results were made from a widerange of agroecological and socio-economic circumstances, ranging from Tripura to Punjab. Thisyear the Tripura state government is devoting 1/3 of its agricultural budget to the spread of SRI.
Report on the Indian National Sri Symposium Convened in Hyderabad, November 17-18, 2006
by Norman Uphoff, CIIFAD, 17 November, 2006