Power sector is a key infrastructure sector in India with a dominant role for State owned institutions in its operation (90% owned and operated by State). It is in the concurrent list with demarcated roles for the State and Central governments. There are many players with muscle - bothprivate and public. Private players are mostly in manufacturing and services, though there are a fewin operations as well. In the post liberalisation phase, role of private players and international capitalhas been increasing. The sector is unionised - worker and officer levels in utilities. It is technically complex and has multiple linkages. Fuel linkages include Water for Hydro, Coal, Petrochemicals, Nuclear, Wind and Bio-mass.
Policy Note on Power Sector - R2
by Sreekumar N, Prayas, Prayas Energy Group, 01 August, 2007
Power sector is a key infrastructure sector in India with a dominant role for State owned institutions in its operation (90% owned and operated by State). It is in the concurrent list withdemarcated roles for the State and Central governments. There are many players with muscle - both private and public. Private players are mostly in manufacturing and services, though there are afew in operations as well. In the post liberalisation phase, role of private players and international capital has been increasing. The sector is unionised - worker and officer levels in utilities.
Policy Note on Power Sector -R1
by Sreekumar N, Prayas, Prayas Energy Group, 01 August, 2007
Solar energy is becoming more economically attractive as technologies improve and the cost of electricity generated by fossil fuels rises.By 2020, hundreds of billions of dollars of investment capital will probably boost global solar-generating capacity 20 to 40 times higher than its current level.As the new sector takes shape, producers of solar components must drive their costs down, utilities must place big bets despite enormous technological uncertainty, and regulators must phase out subsidies with care.The actions these players take will determine the solar sector\'s scale, structure, and performance for years to come.
The economics of solar power
by Peter Lorenz, Dickon Pinner, and Thomas Seitz, The McKinsey Quarterly, 01 June, 2008

The principal goal of the biofuel programme in India must be fossil fuel substitution, while catalysing rural development through this route, as envisaged in a Planning Commission report, should be secondary. Concern for energy security should promote maximisation of production, consequently large-scale plantations might well emerge. In another approach, community and small farmers could be promoted through cooperatives, panchayati raj institutions and the like. The proposal to take up a biodiesel production programme based on cultivation of Jatropha on the wastelands of 26 states might also be stretching the argument that such land is available.

taken from Biofuels: The Way Ahead, Rajeev Kher
EPW, VOL 40 No. 51 December 17 - December 23, 2005